Category:

Social Media guidance

  • Finding your voice

    You have an impressive marketing programme which matches clear corporate objectives; you are active on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter; you are in regular contact with journalists; and you run numerous stakeholder events every year. But have you lost your voice?

    Finding your voiceAmidst all the distractions of managing a multi-disciplinary communications programme, it’s essential to hold on to that distinctive element that defines your business and distinguishes you from the rest. You need your audience to know that it’s you speaking and not one of your competitors.

    Along with a strong visual corporate identity, every company and organisation needs a corporate voice – a consistent underlying persona that connects with your stakeholders. Mood or tone may need to change depending on the context, but the personality your organisation projects needs to be coherent, and appropriate for your brand. If you have put in the work on your corporate profile, so that you know who you are and what you are trying to achieve, don’t let the message get lost in translation.

    Different channels demand different approaches and often different teams will be writing for different platforms. Some people have a natural gift for pithy, attention-grabbing posts perfect for social media. Think Donald Trump. Whatever you think of what he writes, he can certainly get his message across in 140 characters! But you wouldn’t ask someone like that to write a technical article for an engineering audience. Press releases for a consumer audience require a lighter touch than B2B, television ads have to compete for attention in a very crowded space. Whatever the medium, however, your communications need to be convincing, consistent and true to the values of your business.

    Just as a corporate identity needs to be safeguarded so too does a corporate voice. The equivalent of brand guidelines in this case is to have consistency in the sign-off process for all PR and marketing communications. Every press release, article, advert, leaflet and brochure should be seen by one individual acting as the guardian of the brand’s voice. Only by seeing everything is it possible to spot minor inconsistencies or major departures. The brand guardian does not need to have the final say-so on what gets published, although often the Marketing Director or CEO will take this role, but they do need to understand the subtleties of the brand.

    Policing an organisation’s voice on social media is a much harder task. Posts and responses tend to be ‘in the moment’ and are a powerful way for an organisation to use its voice. But it’s essential to have a clear policy in place as to who can represent the company and what they can talk about.  Drawing up a social media plan can avoid some of the pitfalls awaiting the over-enthusiastic tweeter. Just as you wouldn’t pick up the phone to a journalist without talking to your PR team, don’t be tempted to take a scattergun approach to social media.

    Every brand has a personality and your marketing and PR activity give it a voice. Make sure yours is a true reflection of your corporate identity.

     

     

  • Assume nothing!

    This is our unofficial company motto and it has stood us in good stead over the years.

    We all make assumptions: assuming it won’t rain because the weather forecast said it wouldn’t or in my case, assuming that it will rain because I have just washed my hair and I have neither a jacket nor an umbrella!

    But we are all too often completely wrong.

    We tend to believe that other people will buy in to our world view and think and behave in the ways that we expect them to. This is particularly true in marketing and PR. A few examples  illustrate what I mean:

    ‘Our target audiences will want to read about/buy our products’. Just because you have identified someone as a potential customer does not automatically mean that they will appreciate that they should be interested in what you have to sell. At the very least you will need to work at getting their attention and possibly accept the unpalatable fact that some will not respond.

    ‘We’ve been around for years, everyone knows who we are and what we do.’ You need to keep the memory fresh. Times change and personnel, particularly journalists, move on. New players enter the market. Reputations need to be tended regularly and updated if your competitors are not to steal your limelight.

    ‘Big data tells us everything we need to know about our customers. All we have to do is push the right buttons.’ Really? Viewing this from your own experience as a consumer, do you find this a convincing statement? Could you predict exactly how those closest to you will react to something? And be right every time? Political parties often make this mistake and rely on data and focus groups to tailor individual policies that deliver what they think the voters want to hear. But without a distinct, convincing overarching identity which puts the tactical messaging in context, it is unlikely to elicit more than a short-lived response. Here the sum of the parts is definitely not greater than the whole.

    So, treat your audiences with respect, don’t get too comfortable, and know that you have to keep working to capture their attention. The communications space is very overcrowded.

    Assume nothing.

  • 2017. Time to get a grip on your PR

     

    Public Relations planning and strategy for 2017

    Public Relations planning and strategy for 2017

    I am the sort of person who always likes to get a grip. I am not a fan of drifting along hoping that everything will turn out for the best. PR, however, is a ‘slow burn’ activity, building over many weeks and months with the results only apparent long after the hard work has been done. It’s a discipline where patience is definitely a virtue, if not a prerequisite! But ‘slow burn’ does not mean that the quality of the input and the results generated are not linked. PR planning is essential.

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  • #FakeNews. How do you get your message across to an increasingly distrustful public?

    Most people have always been aware that what you read in the papers, see on TV or social media may not be 100% accurate. Anything that has been edited, re-written or re-presented will be coloured by the viewpoint of the person doing the editing – whether consciously or unconsciously. It may be a simple case of lack of space to give the full context, the selection of a soundbite that doesn’t really reflect the speaker’s argument or lack of time to research the background and check the facts. And most readers and viewers will know to make allowances for that.

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  • PR is everywhere

    Please remember: PR is not left in the office when the doors close at the end of the day. Reputation management needs to be a constant concern.

    I am currently sitting on the train, listening with great interest to the conversations of other passengers. It is amazing the information people are happy to loudly impart in the company of assumed strangers.

    train carriage

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